MINI SERIES: Part 3- Abortifacients & Ethics

Photo by Nadezhda Moryak:

Part 3- Abortifacients & Ethics

 

Link to Part 1 introduced you to the terms Emmenagogue and Abortifacient.

Link to Part 2 covered some herbs that emmenagogue specific and some toxicity related cases of pennyroyal essential oil.

 

Part 3 Abortifacients & Ethics- submitted a little later because I wanted to make sure I wrote about it not delicately, but *responsibly*; I could list all the herbs that might cause an abortion to occur, but what if you have complications? What if you die? What if you were unable to abort and had to carry to term a fetus born with deformities or the like? Since I am technically in the business of knowledge, this means you wield that sword how *you* choose to. Essentially, I am not responsible for the outcome of *your* choices (some could and would argue that point).

Libraries and google exist, do they not?

Consider me a variation of the two, except with some working knowledge and first-hand personal experience.

Let me be vehemently clear:

Free speech technically allows me to share knowledge as an Herbalist, it *does not* allow me to diagnose or prescribe jack shit to you or for you.

There are many herbs that could possibly cause uterine contractions. There are also many herbs that could cause a great plethora of malice for any unintended outcome that causes bodily strife unrelated to the uterus but was a byproduct regardless of best intentions. It is my hope that you would find a registered herbalist (or appropriate health care professional) to help guide you through this arduous physical process as it is, or can be, mentally and spiritually taxing on an individual just as much.

Let us now define ‘Uterine Stimulant’ as written by encyclopedia.com:

Uterine Stimulants (uterotonics) are medications that cause, or increase the frequency and intensity of, uterine contractions. These drugs are used to induce (start) labor, facilitate uterine contractions following a miscarriage, induce abortion, or reduce hemorrhage following childbirth of abortion. The three uterotonics used most frequently are oxytocin, prostaglandins, and ergots. Depending upon the type of drug, uterotonics may be given intravenously (IV), intramuscular (IM), as a vaginal gel suppository or in oral form. (Encyclopedia 2022)

I have added the link in case any individuals printing/saving/downloading the entire chart would like to do so for their personal record or library. I do not know how much longer this file will be publicly available. I would not use it as an “end” list but a springboard to seek out which specific herb(s) might work best for you.

Only one herb on this pdf list (from University of Texas at El Pasa) specifically was mentioned as a ‘Uterine Stimulant’ and it is as follows:

Dioscorea villosa Wild yam, Cabeza de negro Root and rhizomes Tea, tinctures, capsules Uterine stimulant

It is a rather long list that shares which parts of the plants are used and how or what form to utilize it as; however, please note dosages are not given! FOR THE REST OF THE CHART CLICK HERE. (Also please see the link about ‘herbal safety’ landing page I have provided from UTEP CLICK HERE)

Some information on the wild yam and its ‘scams’ as quoted below from another source. CLICK HERE to read more on that:

Many wild yam products on the market are being marketed as natural progesterone but in fact contain no progesterone. Other products come with false information such as “wild yam has a very high concentration of a substance called diosgenin which converts in the body to natural progesterone.” Other companies promote the misleading concept of “natural progesterone from wild yam.” (Hudson 2022)

 

 

 

Citations:

https://www.utep.edu/herbal-safety/populations/herbs-to-avoid-during-pregnancy.html

Uterine Stimulants.” Gale Encyclopedia of Nursing and Allied Health. . Encyclopedia.com. 25 Apr. 2022 <https://www.encyclopedia.com>.

Vol4_Issue3_11.pdf (phytopharmajournal.com)

Hudson, Tori (n.d. )Women’s Health Update: Wild Yam, Natural Progesterone, Unraveling the Confusion | ENCOGNITIVE.COM, retrieved 05/11/2022

The History of Birth Control: Early Methods, Legal Issues, & More (healthline.com)

 

DISCLAIMER:

ANY INFORMATION WITHIN THIS MINI-SERIES SHOULD NOT BE TAKEN AS MEDICAL ADVICE

BASICS OF BOTANICALS IS NOT A COMPREHENSIVE COMPILATION. It is meant to be a spring-board type guide to getting individuals into searching in-depth further on their own. If any information is incorrect/missing, please email hwsbotanicalsemporium@gmail.com with the following:

  • Citations missing or incomplete
  • Inaccurate information
  • The specific post/article in question

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INSTAGRAM

 

MINI SERIES: Part 2- Emmenagogue Herbs & Pennyroyal Toxicity Cases

 

Photo by Nadezhda Moryak

 

 

 

Part 2- Emmenagogue Herbs & Pennyroyal Toxicity Cases

In the previous post PART 1 , I wanted to make sure everyone who reads the mini-series is aware of the difference between the two terms; one was emmenagogue and abortifacient. The part 2 post will include a link to read further on pennyroyal toxicity cases and a noncomprehensive list of herbs that may help get blood flowing and may also alleviate some menstrual type related pain- but be sure to ask your doctor for complications or contraindications.  It really helps to know the difference in terminology so you’re not overdosing unintentionally your emmenagogue with what you thought was supposed to be an abortifacient. (Essential oils are mainly topicals or perhaps utilized in diffusers. Never drink or ingest them.)

 

Herbs that move blood and relieve pain

Dr. Michael Tierra L.AC., O.M.D.

1 Vervain 8 Saffron 15 Blue Cohosh
2 Corydalis 9 Calendula 16 Rose Flowers
3 Turmeric 10 Frankincense 17 Chaste Berries
4 Motherwort 11 Myrrh 18 Rue
5 Bugleweed 12 Wild Ginger 19 Collinsonia
6 Peach Seed 13 Penny Royal
7 Safflower 14 Tansy

 

I will not be breaking down each plant/herb within this mini post because I feel PlanetHerbs does it better on their own website as is where I retrieved this chart from, here is the link for them: The Emmenagogues – East West School of Planetary Herbology (planetherbs.com)

We can see here that pennyroyal is actually listed as an EMMENAGOGUE. I will be adding an excerpt from  Naturespoisons.com website on pennyroyals toxicity cases and a link so that the readers can continue to read on further over there.   READ MORE HERE

A brief scenario where an individual consumed the (essential) oil and still left the hospital pregnant despite the trouble and the other one died 7 days later:

Fast-forward nearly 100 years to November 1978 . . . During a four-day period at Denver General Hospital, ED physicians saw two pennyroyal cases (5). The first, an 18-year-old female, presented with abdominal pain and vomiting after intentionally ingesting two one-half-ounce bottles of pennyroyal oil to abort a suspected pregnancy (her pregnancy test at the hospital was negative). The only remarkable finding at the time was metabolic acidosis with an anion gap of 25 mEq/L, but her liver enzymes continued to elevate with commensurate renal failure, and she died 7 days after ingestion. The second patient, a 22-year-old female, ingested 10 mL of pennyroyal oil to induce abortion (her pregnancy test was positive). She presented to the ED with dizziness, and clinical labs were all normal. She was discharged after a two-day observation without further problems and was still pregnant.(Justin 2022)

I am not making any claims that pennyroyal tea would be any better; I suggest not following suggestions that are on social media such as Tiktok. If you had been on there and wondered why so many were against pennyroyal after following that hashtag ride, this would specifically be their reasons.  As with any other of listed herbs, do your due diligence and read up on their toxicity case findings or ask your local health care professional about it for educational purposes or contraindications there may be.

Again, please locate the appropriate healthcare professional for your individual needs.

Here is the link for Registered Herbalist in the US:

Registered Herbalists | American Herbalists Guild

 

Citations

Tierra, n.d., The Emmenagogues – East West School of Planetary Herbology (planetherbs.com)

JUSTIN 2022, Pennyroyal: Nature’s Herb or Abortifacient? | Nature’s Poisons (naturespoisons.com)

 

DISCLAIMER:

ANY INFORMATION WITHIN THIS MINI-SERIES SHOULD NOT BE TAKEN AS MEDICAL ADVICE

BASICS OF BOTANICALS IS NOT A COMPREHENSIVE COMPILATION. It is meant to be a spring-board type guide to getting individuals into searching in-depth further on their own. If any information is incorrect/missing, please email hwsbotanicalsemporium@gmail.com with the following:

  • Citations missing or incomplete
  • Inaccurate information
  • The specific post/article in question

FACEBOOK

INSTAGRAM

MINI SERIES: Part 1- Emmenagogue & Abortifacient

 

 

Photo by Nadezhda Moryak from Pexels

Part 1: Emmenagogue & Abortifacient

So, you want to restart your menstrual flow? Or, did you want an abortion?

So much so that you’re willing to try the first herb mentioned on TikTok? What was it again? Pennyroyal? Do you know which part of the herb you’d use? Are you supposed to ingest essential oils? How much of it should you take to really kickstart that uterine cramping to get flow going?

Tiktok is never the source for these kinds of questions because you open yourself up to hurting yourself so badly you could accidentally kill yourself in the process. Most folks do NOT have your best interests in mind and are only after a buzz word to increase their platform exposure.

Two words I’d like you to familiarize yourself with first are emmenagogue and abortifacient.

Emmenagogue, according to the FREE MEDICAL DICTIONARY by FARLEX:

“A drug or agent that induces or hastens menstrual flow” (emmenagogue, n.d.)

“Emmenagogue is an herb used to increase the menstrual flow. Herbal emmenagogues include black cohosh (Cimicifufa racemosa), blue cohosh (Caulophyllum thalictroides), life root ( Senecio aureus), mugwort (Artemisia vulgaris), pennyroyal (Hedeoma pulegioides), pulsatilla (Anemone pulsatilla), southernwood (Artmesia abrotanum), squaw vine (Mitchella repens), and tansy (Tanacetum vulgare).” (Segen’s 2011)

Abortifacient, according to the FREE MEDICAL DICTIONARY by FARLEX:

  1. Causing abortion
  2. An agent that induces abortion (Miller-Keane 2003)

“ A drug, herb, chemical or other substance that dilates the cervix and causes the uterus to contract, resulting in spontaneous termination of pregnancy. Fringe obstetrics- A potentially toxic herb- e.g., pennyroyal, black cohosh, blue cohosh, parsley, and tansy, which evoke spontaneous abortion. Pharmacology- An agent that induces the expulsion of an embryo or fetus, e.g., prostaglandin E1 analogues- misoprostol, gemeprost.” (abortifacient segen’s 2011)

 

While I am not a Registered Herbalist with the American Herbalist Guild (although I’d love to be) it is my recommendation you seek out your local registered herbalist that’s either listed with the Guild, or someone who has extensive working knowledge (runs a mentorship), or is someone with appropriate credentialing beyond “I taught myself”; which is easy for anyone to say, because there isn’t any credentialing body in the USA for herbalist like there are for nurses and doctors. Scams and curio health items have flooded the market. There’s absolutely nothing wrong with the “I taught myself” crowd because that’s basically where most of us have started from anyway. I’m just suggesting folks seek out someone who’s not just throwing around herbs on a social media platform because they saw it was listed in a free medical dictionary. At least for something as serious as a menstrual restart, abortion, or “uterine flush.”

Please refer to this resource to find your local registered herbalist:

Registered Herbalists | American Herbalists Guild

 

Citations

emmenagogue. (n.d.) The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary. (2007). Retrieved May 10 2022 from https://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/emmenagogue

emmenagogue. (n.d.) Segen’s Medical Dictionary. (2011). Retrieved May 10 2022 from https://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/emmenagogue

Abortifacent. (n.d.) Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. (2003). Retrieved May 10 2022 from https://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/Abortifacent

Abortifacent. (n.d.) Segen’s Medical Dictionary. (2011). Retrieved May 10 2022 from https://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/Abortifacent

DISCLAIMER:

ANY INFORMATION WITHIN THIS MINI-SERIES SHOULD NOT BE TAKEN AS MEDICAL ADVICE

BASICS OF BOTANICALS IS NOT A COMPREHENSIVE COMPILATION. It is meant to be a spring-board type guide to getting individuals into searching in-depth further on their own. If any information is incorrect/missing, please email hwsbotanicalsemporium@gmail.com with the following:

  • Citations missing or incomplete
  • Inaccurate information
  • The specific post/article in question

FACEBOOK

INSTAGRAM